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Macrovision Corporation Uses Legal Scare Tactics Against Emerging Competitor InstallAware Software Corporation

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Macrovision Banks on Legal Scare Tactics to Stifle Competition and Thwart Attempts to Educate Developers about the Emerging Standard in Software Installations

 

San Francisco, CA, February 6 2006 – InstallAware Software Corporation announced the receipt of a legal scare letter from Macrovision Corporation, alleging that software developers may confuse the InstallAware website and products with the defunct ZeroG Corporation’s website. The letter went on to assert rights over “the proprietary hypertext markup language and Java scripts [sic]” used in the defunct ZeroG Corporation website, now owned by Macrovision Corporation.

 

Recently InstallAware Software Corporation launched a “Switch and Win” campaign to encourage users of competitive products to download and try InstallAware, Version 5.0 Installation Toolkit and determine for themselves which is a superior product.  “It seems terribly coincidental that this legal scare letter arrives on the heels of our ‘Switch and Win’ campaign,” observes Sinan Karaca, CEO and Founder of InstallAware Software Corporation.

 

Until March 1st, 2006 users of InstallShield, Wise, and ZeroG products who convert to InstallAware receive 30 days of free project-conversion support, and are entered into a drawing for a chance to win a free Apple iPod shuffle. “We are seeing very high levels of interest in InstallAware. More and more developers and consultants are switching to InstallAware from legacy tools. Our users know they are getting a better product and better support at a better price.  We see Macrovision's decision to use legal scare tactics regarding some inconsequential text on the InstallAware website as a sign that the once mature installation market is ready for a major change.”

 

InstallAware has pioneered installation technologies such as WebAware Components and up to five times better compression, which are still unmatched in the industry, a full two years after InstallAware’s initial launch.  More information on how InstallAware is attracting former InstallShield and ZeroG users is available at http://www.installaware.com/10-migrate.htm.

 

Macrovision, with an assortment of Digital Rights Management, CD/DVD Copy Protection, Video Copy Protection, Peer to Peer Copy Protection, License Management and Software Installation products, shipped its InstallShield 11.5, with two hot fixes issued immediately after product release. “I consider InstallShield to be far too unreliable to use,” writes Thomas Tomiczek, Microsoft MVP and founder of PowerNodes Corporation, on the InstallAware public forums at http://www.installaware.com/forum/.

 

“After acquiring two of the top install vendors in the industry and mixing its product portfolio, Macrovision would appear to be resorting to sending legal scare letters to competitors, instead of competing fairly and squarely,” adds Roy Nevens, Vice President of Sales and Support for InstallAware Software Corporation. “We simply provide a better product and better support.” “As a recent InstallShield convert, I've been very impressed with the quick responses to questions,” hails Joel Hess, a Software Engineer from Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

 

In its letter, Macrovision claims that InstallAware’s website design is “likely to confuse consumers and lead them to erroneously associate InstallAware’s product with Macrovision.”  In response to Macrovision’s completely unfounded accusations, InstallAware Software Corporation is requesting input from software developers, asking them “Are You Confused?”  Macrovision, InstallShield, ZeroG and InstallAware software developers are invited to compare the InstallAware (http://www.installaware.com) and Macrovision/InstallShield/ZeroG websites (http://www.macrovision.com) and vote whether they are confused in any way by the alleged similarities between the two websites and associated products.  A copy of the letter sent by Macrovision to InstallAware Software Corporation can be found at this web address: http://www.installaware.com/threat/.

 

Mark Cuban, the owner of Dallas Mavericks and co-founder of Broadcast.com, sheds light on Macrovision’s tactics in his blog entry at http://www.blogmaverick.com/entry/1234000957046914/. Mark mentions a recent lawsuit by Macrovision against companies breaking Macrovision’s copy protection. Mark views this as evidence that Macrovision’s software fails to work as designed, and highlights Macrovision preferred legal action instead of improving their software.

 

InstallAware, Version 5, is the emerging leader in software development tools for Microsoft Windows software developers using Windows Installer (MSI) technologies.  It is available in four editions, with prices starting at US$199. A time limited trial and more information is available at http://www.installaware.com/.

 

About InstallAware Software Corporation

 

InstallAware Software Corporation, founded in 2003, is a software development company focused solely on state of the art software installation tools which offer the highest compression ratios and bullet-proof installations. The company produces software installation and compression technologies for the Windows Installer (MSI) platform on the Microsoft Windows Operating System.  InstallAware is supported by thousands of users worldwide, and is a Borland Technology Partner. For more information, visit www.installaware.com.

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

 

Sinan Karaca
InstallAware Software Corporation
Email: sinank@installaware.com
Phone: 415 830 4715

 

InstallShield® and ZeroG are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Macrovision Corporation and/or Macrovision Europe Ltd. in the United States and/or other countries. Wise Installation System is a registered trademark of Wise Solutions, Inc. iPod shuffle is a registered trademark and/or service mark of Apple Computer, Inc.